‘Newton’ review: Grawitty in Gravity


Director Amit V Masurkar proves there’s hope. And he does this with a movie that’s unarguably carved its place in the rarefied group that will adorn the top of the list of 2017’s best movies. Newton is a stunning cinematic achievement, eschewing the high-ground or low-browed paths, choosing instead, to a take delightful path of rib-tickling, witty walk-around, not wearing anything on its sleeve, and yet making you cogitate on so many issues it highlights with the warmth of a friendly glow-worm.

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‘Lucknow Central’ review: Singing in Sing Sing


Lucknow Central’s biggest problem is that director Tiwari and co-writer Aseem Arora try to straddle too many tracks – combining Prison Break with Happy New Year to make another The Shawshank Redemption. Except for the music competition, every story and subplot traces its genesis back to this all-time cinematic classic that’ll forever continue to warmly generate life’s lessons even as it ponders over human nature and failings via Morgan Freeman’s soothingly powerful voice.

‘Simran’ review: Flaunting Flawed


The spark and fire generator is Kangana Ranaut, who comes through all shining and emotional armor. Her act as the thieving Praful is nothing short of brilliant. The first time she robs a counter and races away in her car, her expression betrays the sheer shock she feels running through her being, stunned by her own audacity. And then, she configures her expression into a magnificent dissolve of triumph and thrill, realizing that she can get away with it.

‘A Death in the Gunj’ review: Family Dyna(mite)-Mix


The director beautifully builds the characters and their personalities through evenings of drinks, dinner, morning tea, parties, and picnics, getting their hairdo, spectacle frames, clothes and the 70s rebel look as if she’s made you travel back in time. As each scene unfolds, the layers of interaction between each of them and how they impact others does too.

‘13 Reasons Why’ review: An Education Most Harrowing


You’re shocked at the viciousness of people at people who don’t ‘belong’ in their group. You’re mortified as you see Hannah reach out to help, though not ostensibly so, and at folks who just brush her aside – because they don’t care, or are too busy fighting their own battles - and you ask yourself, how many times did you not read the signs? You’re pushed into cringe-mode as you see hurt, yearn, and hurt fester in a vicious cycle of perpetuating isolation and eventual numbness.

‘Dunkirk’ review: A Powerful Cinematic Dynamo


With Dunkirk, director Christopher Nolan, who also wrote this project, scales cinematic heights that’s as startling as it is audacious. In Dunkirk, Nolan devours the screen edaciously, opening up the wormhole of his vision to you -  no screen size on this planet is enough to encompass this spectacular vision, but for now, we’ll have … Continue reading ‘Dunkirk’ review: A Powerful Cinematic Dynamo

‘Mom’ review: A Dish Best Served Simmering


Long after it exits the cinema halls, Mom will be remembered for two things, primarily – apple pips and Sridevi’s stunning performance. While I’ll refrain from speaking about the former, I have no qualms in piping up about the latter. For, in director Ravi Udyawar’s debut project, it is Sridevi who effortlessly dominates the screen … Continue reading ‘Mom’ review: A Dish Best Served Simmering

‘Patriots Day’ review: The Terror and the Terrible


There’s a scene in Patriots Day where Veronica (Khandi Alexander, the only scene she’s in for the length of the movie) from the High-Value Interrogation Group, is interrogating Katherine Russell (Melissa Benoist), wife of terrorist Tamerlan Tsarnaev (Themo Melikidze), who along with younger brother Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (Alex Wolff) set off bombs in Boston and has … Continue reading ‘Patriots Day’ review: The Terror and the Terrible

‘Tubelight’ review: Flickering Barnacles


There I was, as usual coming out of the Friday show, same theatre, this time from director Kabir Khan’s latest outing Tubelight (here, an Indian usage coined to describe a dimwit, and not a documentary on the fluorescent equipment) wondering what strong beverage to quaff, and also about what made the director remake the 2015 … Continue reading ‘Tubelight’ review: Flickering Barnacles

‘Deepwater Horizon’ review: Pipeline of Evil


As I trudged wearily into the shop floor at around 2200 hours wearing my yellow-colored hard hat, the familiar refluxive and reflexive gut feel kicked in every night, the white fluorescent lamps ensconced inside wired mesh cages doing little to dispel the darkness that invariably descended inside of me. The drainage gutters on either side … Continue reading ‘Deepwater Horizon’ review: Pipeline of Evil