‘Aruvi’ and ‘Wonder Woman’ reviews: A Flood and an Explosion

Why the Tamil movie, "Aruvi", and the Hollywood blockbuster "Wonder Woman" are so different and yet have so much more in common than you'd think.

‘Pad Man’ review: Sanitary Nappings

Director R. Balki addresses a very serious, important, and critical social issue about female health and hygiene. But where he ought to have lacerated, he pads it up.

‘Phantom Thread’ review: Genius, Interrupted

Director Paul Thomas Anderson weaves a tapestry of love, human frailties, and darkness that's headlined by an immaculate performance by Daniel Day-Lewis.

‘Padmaavat’ review: The Grand Parade of Packaging

Director Sanjay Leela Bhansali creates a stunning spectacle that envelopes your aural senses. But, when it comes to the story telling...

‘Mukkabaaz’ review: A Punch Too Long

Director Kashyap can be unflinching in his take on life, and it is when he makes you flinch. He keeps the movie’s look rustic and bare-boned, thriving on the lack of pelf of its setting and its characters, and the production design is starkly evocative. It is when Kashyap and his cinematographic team take you inside the belly of these households and keep you there is when you are stirred and shaken in equal measure.

‘The Post’ review: Pressing Issues

It’s obvious that director Steven Spielberg admires the fourth estate and women. His latest outing, The Post, his ode to both, resounds much like a beautifully printed coffee table tribute, one that you can’t help but admire and fall in love with. It’s also on-the-dot timely, considering how both of Spielberg’s favorites have been in … Continue reading ‘The Post’ review: Pressing Issues

‘All the Money in the World’ review: Getty Disturbing Images

Director Scott and cinematographer Dariusz Wolski paint the screen with tones of tension, shades of noir, and ratchet up the heartbeat that much more. But the best lighting and atmospherics is when Getty is onscreen, the shades dark, temporally lonely, and enveloped in an impermeable wrap of green-bags and isolation. Actor Christopher Plummer lends an air of imperiousness that’s impenetrable and sometimes unfathomable – and you know he’s hiding an uneasy past all through for his character. That somehow, tragically, also justifies his own manic obsessiveness with money, estate, paintings, and deals.

‘Tumhari Sulu’ review: Dream Your Dream, But…

In Vidya Balan do you find a carefully studied, thoughtful portrayal of a wife and a mother packed away amongst millions of others like her in the far-flung city suburbs, rushing through the morning routine to pack off her husband, Ashok (Manav Kaul) and son Pranav (Abhishek Sharrma, portraying all the angst and fun so naturally), adrenaline pumping, high steam pressure stewing to ensure they get their breakfast on time, and everything else ready for them to scoot out the house. In her act do you find the sudden listlessness of a mid-morning, the heartbeat quieter, the pace languid, the clew of her life sliding into a routine that could turn foggy with despair. Sulu, thankfully, is made of stronger stuff, and spends her day participating in dial-in radio contests, and actually winning along the way, an assortment of household items that may be useful or back-up as giveaway presents.

‘Moonlight’ review: A Thematic Sonata Called Life

Note the exquisite scene at the table when Little asks Juan what the word faggot means. Ali’s act is so tip-toeingly delicate - his deep voice down to a silky route - so poignant here, as he explains to the child what it means; and to his next question if he’s gay, Juan tells him, “You can be gay, but don’t let anyone call you a faggot”, and that is such a quiet, beautiful embrace of humanity in all its diversity.

‘Murder on the Orient Express’ review: Standard Gauge

The director fails to capture the stifling, terrorizing claustrophobia of the coach, making it look all very simple and straight-forward. Even the top shots inside the carriages that he shoots are more distracting, taking an almost detached view of the goings-on below, you wondering what to make of all the heads you see. With the result, the breathtaking scenery is memorable, the mystery less so. Is that why the denouement, weak by any detective movie standards, takes place outside the train - all the passengers lined up on chairs, as if guests of honor at a valedictory event – instead of inside of the dining car, where the tension in the book and the 1974 movie was unbearable?