‘A Death in the Gunj’ review: Family Dyna(mite)-Mix


The director beautifully builds the characters and their personalities through evenings of drinks, dinner, morning tea, parties, and picnics, getting their hairdo, spectacle frames, clothes and the 70s rebel look as if she’s made you travel back in time. As each scene unfolds, the layers of interaction between each of them and how they impact others does too.

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‘Shubh Mangal Savdhan’ review: Life’s Hard When It Isn’t


Keeping the proceedings alive and kicking is the cast. As Mudit’s parents, Supriya Shukla and Chittaranjan Tripathy are superb. The latter, especially, is brilliant in a scene where he evokes a Pan Parag ad, just because he wanted to, for the longest time; or, when Mudit fails to show up in the bus to Hardwar, his alcohol-laced aggression is classic, more so when it’s followed by the inevitable open-mouthed slumber. On the other side, Seema Bhargava and Neeraj Sood are equally good as the girl’s parents; note again, the latter, as he gets tetchier by the moment and gives some terse advice to the hapless Mudit on the phone.

‘A Gentleman’ review: Pop-crackling-corn


A Gentleman moves swiftly, bunging and valencing all these characters into action using a plot that’s mostly an excuse for fun and some collar-breaking martial arts, some office bobbery, and even a dead body being dragged around a house to avoid detection.

CSN’s ‘Cold Rain’: Infinite Loneliness


As we constantly stare at glowing screens right from the time we rub open our bleary eyes until we slip into fidgety, if not insomniacal REM-sleep cycles, we’re also doing ourselves a disservice, apart from the nocturnal overdrive we push ourselves into. Little do we realize that at the heart of all the connectedness and … Continue reading CSN’s ‘Cold Rain’: Infinite Loneliness

‘13 Reasons Why’ review: An Education Most Harrowing


You’re shocked at the viciousness of people at people who don’t ‘belong’ in their group. You’re mortified as you see Hannah reach out to help, though not ostensibly so, and at folks who just brush her aside – because they don’t care, or are too busy fighting their own battles - and you ask yourself, how many times did you not read the signs? You’re pushed into cringe-mode as you see hurt, yearn, and hurt fester in a vicious cycle of perpetuating isolation and eventual numbness.

‘Dunkirk’ review: A Powerful Cinematic Dynamo


With Dunkirk, director Christopher Nolan, who also wrote this project, scales cinematic heights that’s as startling as it is audacious. In Dunkirk, Nolan devours the screen edaciously, opening up the wormhole of his vision to you -  no screen size on this planet is enough to encompass this spectacular vision, but for now, we’ll have … Continue reading ‘Dunkirk’ review: A Powerful Cinematic Dynamo

‘Spider-Man Homecoming’ review: Does Whatever a Teen Can


In my school days, I always wanted to be a comic book hero. No, I didn’t want comics based on my life, but be one of the heroes from the comics I so desperately devoured in a state of dervish during the summer holidays. Not for me Phantom (didn’t quite fancy his life until Diana … Continue reading ‘Spider-Man Homecoming’ review: Does Whatever a Teen Can

‘Mom’ review: A Dish Best Served Simmering


Long after it exits the cinema halls, Mom will be remembered for two things, primarily – apple pips and Sridevi’s stunning performance. While I’ll refrain from speaking about the former, I have no qualms in piping up about the latter. For, in director Ravi Udyawar’s debut project, it is Sridevi who effortlessly dominates the screen … Continue reading ‘Mom’ review: A Dish Best Served Simmering

‘Patriots Day’ review: The Terror and the Terrible


There’s a scene in Patriots Day where Veronica (Khandi Alexander, the only scene she’s in for the length of the movie) from the High-Value Interrogation Group, is interrogating Katherine Russell (Melissa Benoist), wife of terrorist Tamerlan Tsarnaev (Themo Melikidze), who along with younger brother Dzhokhar Tsarnaev (Alex Wolff) set off bombs in Boston and has … Continue reading ‘Patriots Day’ review: The Terror and the Terrible

‘Tubelight’ review: Flickering Barnacles


There I was, as usual coming out of the Friday show, same theatre, this time from director Kabir Khan’s latest outing Tubelight (here, an Indian usage coined to describe a dimwit, and not a documentary on the fluorescent equipment) wondering what strong beverage to quaff, and also about what made the director remake the 2015 … Continue reading ‘Tubelight’ review: Flickering Barnacles